Hi All,

I’ve decided to close this blog down.  The Anthro Club at Massey is on indefinite hiatus so I’ve started a personal blog.  Much of the same with a bit more of me thrown in.  You can find it here

http://thelifeofapostgradanthrostudent.tumblr.com/

Hope to see some of you over there.

Pippa :)

If we compare Earth’s history to a 24-hour day (with one second equaling 50,000 years),

Earth originates at midnight.
The earliest fossils were deposited at 5:45 A.M.
The first vertebrates appeared at 9:02 P.M.
The earliest mammals, at 10:45 P.M.
The earliest primates, at 11:43 P.M.
The earliest hominins, at 11:57 P.M.
And Homo sapiens arrives 36 seconds before midnight.

Milford H. Wolpoff (via steveyaas)
(Reblogged from archaeosharon)
Anthropologists cannot agree on the meaning of culture nor, in fact, do they know the meaning of ‘meaning’.
John Lloyd - Liff of QI (via anthmusings)
(Reblogged from anthmusings)
(Reblogged from archaeologicalnews)
laboratoryequipment:

Hunter-Gatherers Liked Spicy FoodArchaeologists at York, working with colleagues in Denmark, Germany and Spain, have found evidence of the use of spices in cuisine at the transition to agriculture. The researchers discovered traces of garlic mustard on the charred remains of pottery dating back nearly 7,000 years.The silicate remains of garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) along with animal and fish residues were discovered through microfossil analysis of carbonised food deposits from pots found at sites in Denmark and Germany. The pottery dated from the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition from hunter-gathering to agriculture.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/hunter-gatherers-liked-spicy-food

laboratoryequipment:

Hunter-Gatherers Liked Spicy Food

Archaeologists at York, working with colleagues in Denmark, Germany and Spain, have found evidence of the use of spices in cuisine at the transition to agriculture. The researchers discovered traces of garlic mustard on the charred remains of pottery dating back nearly 7,000 years.

The silicate remains of garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) along with animal and fish residues were discovered through microfossil analysis of carbonised food deposits from pots found at sites in Denmark and Germany. The pottery dated from the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition from hunter-gathering to agriculture.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/08/hunter-gatherers-liked-spicy-food

(Reblogged from ethnographics)

dynamicafrica:

Select images from South African photographer Jodi Bieber’s series Real Beauty, photographing everyday women in South Africa in their underwear, leaving the images untouched so as to counter the incredibly narrow ideals of commercialized beauty propagated largely through popular media.

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

(Reblogged from beautifulspirit-mind)

Book of the Week: Shattering Silence. Women, Nationalism, and Political Subjectivity in Northern Ireland

Begoña Aretxaga. (1997).

This book, the first feminist ethnography of the violence in Northern Ireland, is an analysis of a political conflict through the lens of gender. The case in point is the working-class Catholic resistance to British rule in Northern Ireland. During the 1970s women in Catholic/nationalist districts of Belfast organized themselves into street committees and led popular forms of resistance against the policies of the government of Northern Ireland and, after its demise, against those of the British. In the abundant literature on the conflict, however, the political tactics of nationalist women have passed virtually unnoticed. Begoña Aretxaga argues here that these hitherto invisible practices were an integral part of the social dynamic of the conflict and had important implications for the broader organization of nationalist forms of resistance and gender relationships.

Combining interpretative anthropology and poststructuralist feminist theory, Aretxaga contributes not only to anthropology and feminist studies but also to research on ethnic and social conflict by showing the gendered constitution of political violence. She goes further than asserting that violence affects men and women differently by arguing that the manners in which violence is gendered are not fixed but constantly shifting, depending on the contingencies of history, social class, and ethnic identity. Thus any attempt at subverting gender inequality is necessarily colored by other dimensions of political experience.

(Reblogged from archaeologicalnews)
For the problem is that in anthropology, other people’s secrets are valuable commodities. Ethnographic success is often measured, and anthropological careers often made, by the extent to which the anthropologist gets others to ‘open up’, as this process is so benignly known, and reveal secrets
Don Kulick & Margaret Wilson, ‘Sex, Identity, and Erotic Subjectivity in Anthropological Fieldwork’ (Routledge, 1995)
(Reblogged from mijmering)